Nostalgia: A nice place to visit – but not to live – January 17, 2018 – Daily Chronicle

Instead of discussing the tragic events of 2017, a friend and I recently reminisced about “the good old days.”

Recalling Sunday drives, we wondered, “Do people still do that?”

She remarked, “How did we survive without seat belts and infant car seats?”

Some of us grew up without central heating, indoor plumbing, refrigerators, etc.

Recalling my youth growing up in a small town, I paraphrased an old saying for her: A small town is where something is no sooner done than said.

I told her that if I got into mischief, my parents often knew about it before I arrived home.

While in high school, I once pulled a muscle during gym class and bought a bottle of rubbing alcohol before walking home after school with some school mates. I pretended to sip from the unopened bottle and playfully staggered a bit. Someone called my parents before I arrived home, saying I was inebriated.

Those were innocent times and a much simpler lifestyle. We usually remember the good things and forget we did not have all the luxuries we have today. Most of us want to return if we could retain today’s creature comforts.

Russians launched Sputnik in 1957, and we were never the same again. Jack Parr, the late night television talk show host, remarked “From outhouses to outer space.” We wrongly thought they were behind us in technology.

We had not heard of drug overdoses. Drugs, prescribed by our family doctor, were purchased at the drug store – not on some dark street corner.

Teenagers, for the most part, had two parents and they did not seek the companionship of gangs as a family unit.

Highlight of the week was Saturday night when stores were open and farmers came to town with their wives and children. Fathers went to the local tavern and had a few beers with fellow farmers to discuss crops.  Mothers to purchase weekly groceries and the children bought a nickel bag of popcorn and walked the streets with fellow farmers’ children, where courtships often began.

Every time you gain something, you also lose something.

With all our modern conveniences, we may have sacrificed our innocence.

Let’s hope that modernism is more worthwhile than what we lost.

Treasure today. It’s a gift. That’s why it’s called the present.

 

 

 

Give feedback
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s